Guns & Patriots

Review: ExtremeBeam M4 Scirrako

Review: ExtremeBeam M4 Scirrako

Fear is a completely normal response to darkness.  Humans are sight hunters and our eyes adapted for daylight conditions.  We have a difficult time operating in low light conditions.  That is one reason for always having a powerful flashlight with you when checking on that noise in the middle of the night.

I recently received a M4 Scirrako tactical flashlight from ExtremeBeam for testing.  I had not used their products before, but was eager to give them a try.  The company offers a variety of lighting products for military, law enforcement, hunting and industrial uses.

The M4 Scirrako is a high-power, handheld flashlight that is similar in appearance to tactical lights made by Streamlight, SureFire and others.  It uses a LED and runs on a pair of CR-123A batteries.  Batteries are included with the package.

The head of the flashlight is almost double the diameter of the body, which might preclude the use of the light as a daily carry item.  I was able to carry the light in a cargo pocket without a problem, but it was too large for a regular pocket in a pair of jeans or slacks.  For carry on a police officer’s duty belt or keeping on the night stand, it is small enough to stay out of the way, but large enough for grabbing quickly.  It would also work well as a standard piece of gear in your bug out bag or to carry when hunting.

M4 Scirrako Specifications

  • total light output: 315 lumens
  • peak beam intensity:  24,472 candela
  • useable beam distance:  1090 feet
  • run time on low (ANSI compliant test):  10 hours
  • run time on high (non ANSI test average provided by the manufacturer):  7 hours
  • weight (with batteries): 6.8 ounces
  • length:  5.9”
  • body diameter:  1”
  • bezel diameter:  1.76”
  • battery type:  two CR123A

Light Pattern

On high, the M4 Scirrako has a very tight, bright center with a dim but even periphery cone.  This works very well for anyone needing to illuminate something at distance.  The M4 has a measured useable beam distance of 333 meters, or almost 1100 feet.

My current carry flashlight, a Streamlight ProTacHL, is nearly twice as bright (600 lumens vs. the 315 lumens of the Scirrako).  However, The M4 Scirrako is much more focused.  In fact, the ExtremeBeam has a useable beam that is more than 260 feet longer.

In contrast, the less focused Streamlight throws a wider cone of bright light, allowing the user to see more of an area the is close up.  This is definitely a case where the total light output doesn’t tell the whole story, and you need to have an idea of what your needs are when shopping for a flashlight.

Unlike many tactical flashlights, the beam is adjustable by turning the flashlight head.  By turning the bezel clockwise, the user can widen the center focal point.  However, I found this produced a doughnut-like ring of light with a dim center rather than a wide area of bright light.  Although I had hoped otherwise, I found the adjustable head to be a useless feature.

Beams side-by-side

Beams side-by-side

Switch

The Extreme Beam uses a single switch in the tailcap to activate the light and to cycle through different modes.  A partial press gives the user a momentary on/off capability.  A full click turns the light on until the switch is fully clicked again.

The activation switch is wide and textured.  It protrudes slightly above the end of the flashlight, making it very easy to activate.

The M4 Scirrako has three modes:  high, low and strobe.  Each time the switch is partially depressed, the light cycles to the next mode.  For example, three presses will activate the strobe.  If you do not use the light for approximately five to six seconds, the light will default back to the high mode.

The system worked flawlessly as it was set up.  For my preferences, though, the set up is wrong for my use.  If I am searching an area for an intruder, I will typically illuminate an area briefly, move and then momentarily activate the light again.  That time can be well under five seconds, which means the second activation will be low power.  I would much rather have a system that allowed me to select a mode independent of the activation so I know I will have my preferred setting when I activate the light.

Additional Thoughts

The Scirrako feels good in the hand and functioned flawlessly throughout my testing.  The construction of the light appears to be top notch.  The light has double O-rings on both ends and is waterproof (not resistant) up to 20 meters.

Using the supplied batteries, I turned the flashlight on high and let it continuously run to see what I could expect from a single set.  Without using any testing equipment other than my eyes and a watch, the included set of batteries ran for two hours and 10 minutes before the light level dipped to about that of the low setting.  That’s pretty good in my estimation.

I ran a pair of Streamlight branded CR-123A batteries in the light for the balance of the testing without any observable dip in power.

ExtremeBeam offers tape switches and other accessories for mounting the light on firearms.  The company states the lights are durable enough to be mounted on any gun up to .50 caliber.  The diameter of the flashlight body should allow it to work with the majority of existing flashlight mounts on the market.

The M4 Scirrako is covered by a limited lifetime warranty that covers defects in materials and workmanship.  You have to have the original receipt, so make sure you save that if you pick one up.

Like many products, the flashlight is made in China.  MSRP is $59.95.

Sign Up
DISQUS COMMENTS

FACEBOOK COMMENTS

Comment with Facebook