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Where do public school teachers send their own kids?

Where do public school teachers send their own kids?

Guy walks into a restaurant. Says to the waitress, “I’d like some scrambled eggs and some kind words.” She brings the eggs. The guy smiles, “Now how about the kind words?” Waitress whispers, “Don’t eat the eggs.”

This brings us to the fact that urban public school teachers are about two times more likely than non-teachers to send their own children to private schools. In other words, many public school teachers whisper to parents, “Don’t eat the eggs.”

About 11 percent of all parents — nationwide, rural and urban — send their children to private schools. The numbers are much higher in urban areas. One study found that in Philadelphia a staggering 44 percent of public school teachers send their own kids to private schools. In Cincinnati and Chicago, 41 and 39 percent of public school teachers, respectively, pay for a private school education for their children. In Rochester, New York, it’s 38 percent. In Baltimore it’s 35 percent, San Francisco is 34 percent and New York-Northeastern New Jersey is 33 percent. In Los Angeles nearly 25 percent of public school teachers send their kids to private school versus 16 percent of Angelenos who do so.

The study, conducted in 2004 by the Fordham Institute, said: “These findings … are apt to be embarrassing for teacher unions, considering those organizations’ political animus toward assisting families to select among schools. But these results do not surprise most practicing teachers to whom we speak. … The data have shown the same basic pattern since we first happened upon them two decades ago: Urban public school teachers are more apt to send their own children to private schools than is the general public. One might say this shows how conservative teachers are. They continue doing what they’ve always done. Or it might indicate that they have long been discerning connoisseurs of education. …

“The middle class will tolerate a lot — disorder, decay, and dismay, an unwholesome environment, petty crime, potholes, chicanery and rudeness. One thing, however, that middle class parents will not tolerate is bad schools for their children. To escape them, they will pay out-of-pocket or vote with their feet. That is what discerning teachers do.”

What about members of Congress? Where do they send their own children?

A 2007 Heritage Foundation study found that 37 percent of representatives and 45 percent of senators with school-age children sent their own kids to private school. Of the members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus with school-age children, 38 percent sent them to private school. Of the members of the Congressional Black Caucus with school-age children, 52 percent sent them to private school.

The ex-mayor of Los Angeles, Antonio Villaraigosa, was asked why he did not have his own kids in public school despite his strong advocacy of public education. Villaraigosa, whose wife was a public school teacher, said, “I’m doing like every parent does. I’m going to put my kids in the best school I can. My kids were in a neighborhood public school until just this year. We’ve decided to put them in a Catholic school. We’ve done that because we want our kids to have the best education they can. If I can get that education in a public school, I’ll do it, but I won’t sacrifice my children any more than I could ask you to do the same.”

When he got elected president, Barack Obama and his wife made a big display of looking into D.C. public schools for his two daughters to attend. But the Obamas chose Sidwell Friends, the elite private school whose alums include Chelsea Clinton. Obama’s own mother sent the then-10-year-old to live with her parents — so he could attend Punahou Academy, the most exclusive prep school on the island. In fact, from Punahou to Occidental (a private college in Los Angeles) to Columbia (where he completed college) to Harvard Law, Obama is a product of private education.

So how does this square with Obama’s opposition to the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program that offered a voucher for the children of participating parents? It doesn’t.

Here’s what Obama’s Office of Management and Budget said about the program: “Rigorous evaluation over several years demonstrates that the D.C. program has not yielded improved student achievement by its scholarship recipients compared to other students in D.C.”

Tell that to the educator/consultant the Department of Education hired to evaluate the program. Testifying before the Senate Committee on Homeland Security, Patrick Wolf, a University of Arkansas education policy professor who spent more than 10 years evaluating school choice programs in D.C., Milwaukee, New York and Dayton, Ohio, said, “In my opinion, by … boosting high school graduation rates and generating a wealth of evidence suggesting that students also benefited in reading achievement, the D.C. OSP has accomplished what few educational interventions can claim: It markedly improved important education outcomes for low-income inner-city students.”

President Barack Obama calls education “the civil rights issue of our time.” Yet, his opposition to K-12 education vouchers guarantees that many of America’s kids will sit in back of the bus.

Larry Elder is a best-selling author and radio talk-show host.

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  • Altosackbuteer

    I worked as a bench chemist with the US Food & Drug Administration for 26 years. My 3rd and final duty station was at FDA’s Winchester, MA facility.

    One of my colleagues there was a Black lady whose husband worked as a headmaster at one of the Boston area’s public intermediate schools. She and her husband sent their son to the local Catholic school.

    A number of our colleagues used to talk behind her back (naturally) and accuse her of hypocrisy, for not sending their own son to the system from which they drew an income.

    I asked her about this one day, and she replied to me that even if they could find a public school with decent academic standards, they were far from confident that they could send their beloved son to any public school without him losing his soul in the process, so they went with the Catholic school primarily for this reason.

  • daibutsu

    Thanks for sharing that poignant and relevant story.

  • david

    Spot on ! Just another example that Obamadumborama hates America.

  • LarryCicero

    Did DaveD get banned david? Still stupid.

  • globalcrap

    Just look at what your public schools put out on the streets, mindless O Bogus souls . Type in Chicago murders 2013, or any other liberal city ,and see what the O Bogus public schools produced .

  • Altosackbuteer

    Coming from you, I will choose to accept your words at face value, and with appreciation.

  • GeorgeStGeorge

    It’s a free market decision. If you can afford something better, you’ll get it, whether it’s food, housing, medicine, or in this case, education. The irony is that public school teachers, thanks to their unions, can afford better education than they provide.

  • GeorgeStGeorge

    Hey, man! Liberal public schools sucked LONG before Obama showed up.

  • globalcrap

    You are a 100% correct, but they only got worse with these new O Bogus teachers teaching O Bogus lies about America.

  • Nyte

    I am not sure what the point is here. That Liberals are hypocritrical — ?

    That smaller is better The issue remains, how do reinvest conservatives back into the public school system? Currentlystudents are being delivered so much in the way of liberal dogma with no counter analysis as to how to think and live.
    We have spent too much effort bashing them as opposed to reforming them – we have actually abandoned them. And as is my harp on harp. Public schools are not going away.

    Next to family and churches, they remain the largest influental actor on our generational legacy and future. And like inattentive farmers we have not supported the educators in the system. We hav done everything to undermine them and we wonder wht there are so many democrats and liberals.

    Well, wonder no more.

  • pgp62

    Kind of reminds me of how Senators and Congressman are taking advantage of the wonders of Obama Care.

  • RenegadeScholar

    We hav done everything to undermine them and we wonder wht there are so many democrats and liberals.

    They undermine us.

    Are they out protesting to get rid of red tape to be able to teach better? Are they demanding more freedom to be able to teach better? Are they marching on Washington DC to protest the federal intervention in their education? Are they striking for less paperwork?

    No–they pretty much always just demand more pay.

    Those with a choice choose AGAINST public schools.

  • RenegadeScholar

    Leftists pretty naturally consider themselves exempt from the rules they want to foist on everyone else.

    ObamaCare will continue to be a big eye-opener to them. They’re all happy to have “the rich” pay more for “the people.” But when it comes to their own money, things always change.

  • Borghesius

    We have supported schools, and buildings, and in return have gotten a entitlement mindset from public school teachers and administrators, who condescendingly nod and mouth soothing sounds as they think “We are the experts with degrees, we know what is best for your children more than you. We will change the World!” The public school system is the socialist sub-economy within our overall economy, and it shows. And they teach it, both overtly and in a “Medium is the Message” way.

    Where do you think Reid and Obama got their government shutdown pain strategy? Everytime a school levy is offered, schools threaten to shut down portions to cause as much pain to the parents as possible, instead of trimming administration or limiting salary increases, which is the overwhelming majority of school expenses.

    The point is, the public school system is structurally inferior because it is not required to be competitive, and is protected from competition by a government-union unholy alliance. If the money followed the student then we see all parents free to chose, not just those well off enough (teachers) to chose better schools.

  • Nyte

    Borghesius wrote,

    “Where do you think Reid and Obama got their government shutdown pain strategy? Everytime a school levy is offered, schools threaten to shut down portions to cause as much pain to the parents as possible, instead of trimming administration or limiting salary increases, which is the overwhelming majority of school expenses.

    The point is, the public school system is structurally inferior because it is not required to be competitive, and is protected from competition by a government-union unholy alliance. If the money followed the student then we see all parents free to chose, not just those well off enough (teachers) to chose better schools.”

    I am not sure where we disagree. I think my position reflects that our educational system to include the collegiate and university programs are not proving enough distributive counter narratives a dialectic which fosters critical thought, decision making and dynamic solutions to issues, if required.

    But a continued process of abandoning the system to their own devices is unsound. They aren’t going anywhere anytime soon. I have no issues with private education. I graduated from two private schools. No issues — none. I have no issues with the specifics of your comments — not enough to contend against. But unless we start fostering conservatives back into education — we are not likely to make much ground in fostering the direction of the country.

    A brief look at these numbers: Total number of private schools: 28,220. Elementary: 16,370; Secondary: 3,040; Combined: 8,810 a ratio of nearly one one — That is stellar.

    But consider this the number of students who will enter the community compared to this: Total number of public schools: 132,656
 Elementary: 88,982 Secondary: 27,575 Combined: 14,837 Ratio 7:1 and I think they are upping that ratio — speculation on my part.

    http://www.edreform.com/2012/04/k-12-facts/#sthash.35c2umbV.dpuf
    That means that private schools represents just 21% of the educational input by private institutions and l’est we forget not all of those are conservative or objective dialectic paradigms. So liberals are churning out 89% of the population, well one can assume that not all public education is a mess or fully liberal so I will be generous here let’s that number is seventy-five percent based on the sheer numbers alone whose message is getting out and upon getting out whose message and agendas will be policy and law — or we saw with same sex marriage — Prop 8 gone by shifts in a population one would think educated in fundamental logic and biology courses of the 3o’s or forties — one would thing would have privately laughed at the notion. That’s what’s going on in our institutions without challenge. How long before several generations overhaul some other social fabric?

    This is more of a state issue as it should be. But merely bemoaning how bad they are — whilst ignoring the product get5s us more bad policy — You think this healthcare initiative is rotten — the goal is single payer — Tell me the number of educational institutions are that are not priming that pump as they did same sex marriage?

    Ignoring the schools is not an answer. Good kids from liberal education still vote.

    That’s 7 liberals to 2 conservatives and of course not everyone that goes to a public school is a liberal. Some will reject the notions — but think of those that will not. Say most — these end numbers are of course not exact, they may even be off a couple points. But what is clear is that the ability to influence policy rests with those with the numbers.

  • CaptainAhab

    I know a family where the mother teaches in the local public elementary school, and the father teaches in a Christian school 40 minutes away. They sent their boy to the private school for 6 years, and in his final two years of high school he wanted to go to the public school, because he wanted to play sports in an arena that would get him more exposure and a better chance at a sports scholarship, in addition to academic scholarships that he would probably get at either school.
    The public school, after years in the private school, was a cake walk. He said that it was almost like taking classes that he took 2 years prior, it was so watered down. It was so easy he said he barely had to study, because it was mostly a review of what he had already learned in the private school.

  • Nyte

    RenegadeScholar,
    “We hav done everything to undermine them and we wonder wht there are so many democrats and liberals.
    They undermine us.
    Are they out protesting to get rid of red tape to be able to teach better? Are they demanding more freedom to be able to teach better? Are they marching on Washington DC to protest the federal intervention in their education? Are they striking for less paperwork?
    No–they pretty much always just demand more pay.
    Those with a choice choose AGAINST public schools”
    Again, I agree. And I think that is the point. They can’t undermine you as I am single and have no kids yet —- laughing.
    I agree 100% the educational system has become a reflection of the laisser fair life. And like all things, if we don’t show up we cannot play and that is the issue to do battle on all fronts not merely the fronts that act as choir.
    The public system is a morass of a mess in many and nice every body’s cool world in most. Instructors dress like students, speak like students and on and on —-
    We set no example by dropping out of a process that will have profound impact good greif — I am keenly aware of the end times — but I doubt it’s next week, next year, next twenty years, next 100 years — in the mean time the battle remains in the tilling fields not after market –

  • Nyte

    ·
    Borghesius wrote,

    “Where do you
    think Reid and Obama got their government shutdown pain strategy? Every time a
    school levy is offered, schools threaten to shut down portions to cause as much
    pain to the parents as possible, instead of trimming administration or limiting
    salary increases, which is the overwhelming majority of school expenses.

    The point is, the
    public school system is structurally inferior because it is not required to be
    competitive, and is protected from competition by a government-union unholy
    alliance. If the money followed the student then we see all parents free to
    chose, not just those well off enough (teachers) to chose better schools.”

    I am not sure where
    we disagree. I think my position reflects that our educational system to
    include the collegiate and university programs are not proving enough
    distributive counter narratives a dialectic which fosters critical thought,
    decision making and dynamic solutions to issues, if required.

    But a continued
    process of abandoning the system to their own devices is unsound. They aren’t
    going anywhere anytime soon. I have no issues with private education. I
    graduated from two private schools. No issues — none. I have no issues with
    the specifics of your comments — not enough to contend against. But unless we
    start fostering conservatives back into education — we are not likely to make
    much ground in fostering the direction of the country.

    A brief look at
    these numbers: Total number of private schools: 28,220. Elementary: 16,370;
    Secondary: 3,040; Combined: 8,810 a ratio of nearly one one — That is stellar.

    But consider this
    the number of students who will enter the community compared to this: Total
    number of public schools: 132,656
 Elementary: 88,982 Secondary: 27,575
    Combined: 14,837 Ratio 7:1 and I think they are upping that ratio –
    speculation on my part.

    http://www.edreform.com/2012/0

    That means that private schools represents just 21% of the educational input by
    private institutions and l’est we forget not all of those are conservative or
    objective dialectic paradigms. So liberals are churning out 89% of the
    population, well one can assume that not all public education is a mess or
    fully liberal so I will be generous here let’s that number is seventy-five
    percent based on the sheer numbers alone whose message is getting out and upon
    getting out whose message and agendas will be policy and law — or we saw with
    same sex marriage — Prop 8 gone by shifts in a population one would think
    educated in fundamental logic and biology courses of the 3o’s or forties — one
    would thing would have privately laughed at the notion. That’s what’s going on
    in our institutions without challenge. How long before several generations
    overhaul some other social fabric?

    This is more of a
    state issue as it should be. But merely bemoaning how bad they are — whilst
    ignoring the product get5s us more bad policy — You think this healthcare
    initiative is rotten — the goal is single payer — Tell me the number of
    educational institutions are that are not priming that pump as they did same
    sex marriage?

    Ignoring the schools
    is not an answer. Good kids from liberal education still vote.

    That’s
    7 liberals to 2 conservatives and of course not everyone that goes to a public
    school is a liberal. Some will reject the notions — but think of those that
    will not. Say most — these end numbers are of course not exact, they may even
    be off a couple points. But what is clear is that the ability to influence
    policy rests with those with the numbers

  • http://www.facebook.com/aemoreira81 aemoreira81

    Straight up, I will say that I don’t see a problem with this. The teachers want their children to learn, and they know that these students in public schools (especially inner city schools) not only do not desire to learn, but are like bad prion proteins—seeking to turn good students bad (in layman’s terms, poisonous to those who want to learn).

    @Borghesius:disqus – the real problem is that you can pour as much money and resources as you want at the problem…but you will only get results with appreciation. That will be the case with any school.

    @GeorgeStGeorge:disqus – whether or not the teachers are providing an inferior quality or the students don’t want to learn is very debatable.

  • Joseph23006

    It has been no secret that presidents and members of congress have sent their children to private schools, Sidwell being the most named. The hypocrasy is in the “Do as I say, not as I do.” mentality of the president and congress in not allowing vouchers, allowing choice. The Department of Education should be abolished along with the edicts it has forced on schools, it has not about education but the indoctrination of political correctness.

  • rosech

    So stop funding public schools! The teachers on the whole are not well trained, the Common Core program is a communist program, parents are not enough interested in a good education for their children even though they may go on cruises, gambling, etc. How do I know? I was a teacher and decided I needed a life that was not in a union nor did not really teach anything the students needed at any level for life.

  • Borghesius

    You value something more, and work harder at it, if you are paying for it.
    Parents know this too. “We’re paying good money for this education, you will do your homework!”.

    Oh, you are right about the pouring of money and resources! We say this about public schools all the time, while private schools often perform better with less.

  • http://www.facebook.com/aemoreira81 aemoreira81

    In the private schools, the reason why they perform better with less is because the students there desire success on a greater scale.

  • Borghesius

    I’m not sure we do either. But like the teachers and the LA mayor, we can’t count on sending our 5-22 year olds with partially formed brains as our shock troops hoping to improve what is a massive education bureaucracy, from the Education Colleges, to Teachers Unions.

    We are not ignoring the public schools. The theory is, that as charter schools, private schools, internet schools, and home schools siphon off students and outperform the public schools, they will HAVE to improve just for self preservation. In the process, we create a culture among parents and students that education is important. My wife is a learning coach for a disadvantaged cousin (the parents are the disadvantage, thats why she is doing it) for an on-line charter school. For some events, we interact with other charters, including inner city charters, including ones that aren’t as lily white as the picture above. These students are not afraid that getting an education is “acting white”. Jindal in LA is trying to make this work, but Obama and Eric Holder, heads of the government – union unholy alliance, are trying to block it, just as they block it in DC, and every other city.

    How do we change such a system, that beats down teachers, parents, students, and claims that it knows best? Where politically incestuous school boards ignore anyone that speaks up, and does all their business in closed “executive session”? Sure, we can try to weasel our way in, as they have ever since John Dewey (I hate that man). But the public system itself was set up to be what it is, I;m not sure it can be reformed ever because it’s nature is collectivist, and so I also want alternatives, educational diversity.

  • http://poorwilber.blogspot.com Poor Wilber

    If you are not home schooling or putting your kids in a private school, your not educating them.

  • Borghesius

    Yes! How do we transfer that to public schools as well?

    Immigrant parents used to do that. To stereotype, Asian parents do this. Its cultural.

    Part of the problem, is that all schools foster academic skills, when not all people are academics. I would have earlier splits to trade/non-academic tracks, after base reading, math, civics.

    But in keeping with free will, you can’t save people who don’t want to be saved.

  • rochesternative

    I am a teacher. I totally agree that schools foster academic skills and that not all children are destined for college. Over the years, I have taught in public, private and Catholic schools. I have sent my children to the same, including some excellent charter schools. No child should be placed on a trade track to early, but my eldest son (now in an urban public school) is 17 in the 10th grade. He has no motivation, no desire to do anything. He is just piddling along hoping to escape. He wants to join the military, but can’t without a high school diploma. He has no options (in NY) except to get a Regents diploma which includes at least 2 years of algebra and geometry/ He HATES math. Thus, he keeps failing. I’d welcome a trade program for him. (mind: he’s very smart, just lazy)

  • rochesternative

    This is not true. I am a huge advocate for private schools. But many public schools and charter schools do pretty incredible things. In Rochester NY the UnCommon Schools network is amazing.

  • Nyte

    Borghesius wrote,
    “We are not ignoring the public schools. The theory is, that as charter schools, private schools, internet schools, and home schools siphon off students and outperform the public schools, they will HAVE to improve just for self preservation.”
    That is not a hopeful sign that you get my meaning. Most people are unable to entertain home schooling. Two jobs both parents work and I doubt most will even have the skill set to do home schooling in either arena. The social educational model still puts more kids in the society and whether one has a degree or not — the prevailing school of thought is what will influence society.
    Now I don’t have children, so if you are comfortable with merely providing for your kids in whatever private domain model you choose the field of influence is to the numbers. The democrats are working on the numbers and that is where we loose and lose big. One would think that our traditional values are at play in more homes and more lives and I think most people of any income rest with traditional models. But I am not inclined to ignore the reality that we are operating in a shifting social arena.
    Excuse the delay —

  • Slimdaddy

    You make a very important point regarding splits into trade schools. In modern day education theory, there is the patently ridiculous notion that ALL kids desire a college education, and hence, high school curriculum must be focused on achieving that end. Not only is this demonstrably wrong, it is expensive and a near treasonous disservice to those with God-given talent for trades.

    I took a one year sabbatical to teach high school in a poor rural area of South Texas that was surrounded by four state prisons. A significant proportion of the public school population drew from families (I use the term lightly) who had parents in prison or released in the not-too-distant past. Needless to say, the classroom environment was difficult at best. What was the most popular class(es) at the high school? Welding. It was hugely popular because the students saw the skills they could gain in the three welding classes could prepare them for oil field jobs that paid almost 300% better than jobs in the area without this skill. Armed with this data, the local educrats still insisted on traditional college-focused curriculum rather than allowing for more trades oriented classes. This is a disservice to the students, to the taxpayers, and the the local community that could enjoy significantly greater economic growth associated with higher average wages. Yet the educrats drone on and insist we continue the status quo…

  • Slimdaddy

    When I taught, I actually had parents tell me that once their kid entered school property, his/her behavior was the school’s responsibility. This mentality produces students with limited interest in learning, and an even more limited sense of personal accountability. A school with significant percentages of kids like this will always struggle to produce acceptable outcomes, even if they are fortunate enough to have excellent teachers.

  • Slimdaddy

    My kids attended a charter school for several years and I was consistently impressed by the curriculum, the expectation of success, and the teacher’s zeal for instruction. When comparing the content of my kid’s charter school classes vs. those of my sister’s kids who were in public schools, the charter school classes were instructing on topics several years advanced over the public schools. Moreover, the results on standardized test results between this charter school and the local public schools was so embarrassing to the local educrats, they had the public reporting of said results spiked (contrary to state law). When an intrepid reporter uncovered this conspiracy, she was sued by the public school district. It was a messy affair and the reporter was eventually vindicated while the school district was humiliated resulting in several losing their sinecures.

  • Slimdaddy

    It is competition that the educrats abhor. Not only does competition produce data confirming the collectivists’ failure to perform, it is anethema to their most beloved ideologies.

  • Altosackbuteer

    I believe every word of that.

  • Micha_Elyi

    If “can’t save people who don’t want to be saved” then we should abolish compulsory school attendance laws.

  • Micha_Elyi

    When I taught, I actually had parents tell me that once their kid
    entered school property, his/her behavior was the school’s
    responsibility.
    –Slimdaddy

    That’s another strong reason to abolish compulsory school attendance laws.

    Also, what those parents believe is that the purpose of schooling is to enable their practice of part-time child abandonment. Child abandoners should go to prison and the children they abandon should be welcomed into modern humanely-run orphanages.

  • Micha_Elyi

    “No–they pretty much always just demand more pay.”–Renegade Scholar

    More pay for less work is every union drone’s demand. Just look around you and see.

    Teacher’s union drones have another reason for demanding more pay. A desperate reason. They want enough money to afford private school for their own kids.

  • warrant4

    Sigh. Partisanship is killing this country.
    For one thing, how about stop beating up on the “teachers”. We who teach are the lowest members of the education food chain, one step (barely) above the custodial and food service staffs. We have very little autonomy to do better things in the classrooms. Target the decision makers and lay off us for a while, OK?

    For another. Question: Where does every “conservative” journalist and pundit send their kids? EVERYONE who has any sense and the resources gets their kids out of the standard public school sewer.
    Charter schools were a creation of compromise. Culling out all of the “special needs” students and “problem” parents, charter schools get to pick and choose their student population. So of course they excel. Duh.

    End result. Some of us (teachers) are in the trenches fighting hard. Motivated and well-behaved kids are gone to charters, privates, and homeschooling (and they should). We who are left holding the fort in the Title 1 schools without the protective unions (most teacher “unions” are NOT collective bargaining vehicles) also suffer from abusive parents, abusive supervision, arrogant and clueless “consultants”, apathetic leftists and hostile rightists.
    So keep beating on us.

    As we said in the Navy: “Floggings will continue until morale improves”.

  • Nyte

    warrant4,

    I am not sure I buy that all of the smart kids are gone.

    But you do have my sympathies . . . and my appreciation for all you do.

  • BarrackHussein

    They didn’t even address the issue that your kids are not safe in public schools…

  • warrant4

    One has to decide between two incomes and their children’s hearts and minds. As for skill sets, there are many home school programs available and affordable from K to 12. Religious and secular, web based, stand-alone, with and without consult services, there are many programs to pick from.
    No one need fear they do not have the academic preparation to be a good home school teacher.

  • Nyte

    warrant4 wrote,
    “One has to decide between two incomes and their children’s hearts and minds. As for skill sets, there are many home school programs available and affordable from K to 12. Religious and secular, web based, stand-alone, with and without consult services, there are many programs to pick from.
    No one need fear they do not have the academic preparation to be a good home school teacher.”

    One could discuss the merits of private education all day as well as the method of homescholling effectiveness and your suggestion of the ease of application all day.

    But in the end, the likelihood of public education is not going away anytime soon. And I doubt that many parents are up to collegial educational degree standards orwould want to be.

    Conservatives remain in the same dilemma more liberals training more students– and that is not going to solved by home schooling programs.

    That is only addressed by conservatives returning to the crop fields and tilling the soil for eager young minds to have a counter to liberal philosophy and henc behavior.

    Excuse the delay in responding

  • Sir Aaron

    Fortunately for private school kids, a lot of athletics are now done through clubs making high school sports (at public schools), except football, entirely unnecessary.

  • gene lalor

    How to Encourage Bullies in Private or Public Schools

    When University of Texas at Arlington criminologist Seokjin Jeong conducted a study of data collected from 7,000 students from every state in the Union, he expected the results would reinforce what he and most educators would like to believe about school anti-bullying programs, namely that they work and are effective.

    However, Jeong discovered the opposite, namely that “anti-bullying programs, either intervention or prevention does not work” and, in fact, may be counter-productive. It seems that kids attending schools with anti-bullying programs were more likely to become victims of bullies and students at schools which hadn’t instituted anti-bullying programs were less likely to be victimized.

    The results apparently shocked Jeong who had believed that, “Usually people expect an anti-bullying program to have some impact–some positive impact” and that videos showing examples of bullying and intervention techniques on how to intervene would either stop or mitigate such incidents. Jeong now believes they teach students different bullying techniques and just educate kids on new mehods of bullying via social media and texting.

    Jeong said students with ill intentions, (i.e., potential school bullies), ”are able to learn, there are new techniques [and gain] new skills.” He thinks students might see video examples and then want to try them out and that some programs teach kids how to bully without leaving any evidence, whatever that means. (http://tinyurl.com/llxz4g8)

    Jeong believes that “This study raises an alarm. There is a possibility of negative impact from anti-bullying programs,” a conclusion the equivalent of discovering the existence of irrational intolerance within human hearts when those hearts are subjected to irrational intolerance.

    Seokjin Jeong apparently never investigated nor observed the negative impact on students of such school programs as the ultra-liberal Florence High School in Colorado where young girls were threatened with hate crimes charges because they complained about being harassed by a transgender boy lurking in their bathroom.

    Nor did Jeong mention Alliance High School in Nebraska Principal Pat Jones who was so worried that some of his students didn’t know the federal government had been shut down last week that he announced that Alliance High would skip reciting the Pledge of Allegiance every morning to remind them of the federal shutdown.

    Nor did Jeong reference 9 year old Aaron Dugmore who committed suicide last February after being mercilessly bullied by an Asian gang at England’s Erdington Hall Primary School, bullying his mother complained about a number of times but who was ignored.

    Whether in schools, in the workplace, or in neighborhoods, bullying is most often the result of children and adults reacting against against societally-condoned bullying (like young girls forced to share bathrooms with boys with gender issues), school principals overstepping their authority (like dumping the Pledge of Allegiance instead of teaching students), and school administrators ignoring valid parental complaints in the interests of political correctness (like favoring one race over another).

    Of course, then there are goofballs such as the father of a player on the Western Hills High School football team in Texas who claimed Aledo High School coach Tim Buchanan encouraged his players to bully opponents by running up the score which ended up Aledo–91, Western Hills–zero. Buchanan later said, “The score could have very easily been 150 to nothing,” which probably would have given the goofball a coronary.