Human Events Blog

Sensitive documents litter the ruins of unsecured Benghazi consulate

“More than three weeks after attacks in this city killed the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans, sensitive documents remained only loosely secured in the remains of the U.S. mission here on Wednesday, offering visitors easy access to delicate details about American operations in Libya,” reports the Washington Post.

What sort of documents?

Documents detailing weapons collection efforts, emergency evacuation protocols, the full internal itinerary of Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens’s trip and the personnel records of Libyans who were contracted to secure the mission were among the items scattered across the floors of the looted compound when a Washington Post reporter and a translator visited Wednesday.

Wow.  Trained FBI agents cant’ get anywhere near Benghazi, but reporters are just wandering around and scooping up sensitive documents?

Was it at least tough to get in there?

Although the gates to the compound were locked several days after the attacks, looters and curiosity-seekers were free to roam in the initial chaotic aftermath, and many documents may already have disappeared.

No government-provided security forces are guarding the compound, and Libyan investigators have visited just once, according to a member of the family who owns the compound and who allowed the journalists to enter Wednesday.

The State Department says that “security the site has obviously been a challenge.”  They don’t seem to have risen to that challenge very well.

Say, do any of these unsecured documents have any bearing on the Administration’s failure to secure the consulate against growing threats of attack?

At least one document found amid the clutter indicates that Americans at the mission were discussing the possibility of an attack in early September, just two days before the assault took place. The document is a memorandum dated Sept. 9 from the U.S. mission’s security office to the 17th February Martyrs Brigade, the Libyan-government-sanctioned militia that was guarding the compound, making plans for a “quick reaction force,” or QRF, that would provide security.

You mean they were expecting that “spontaneous movie protest” to erupt on the completely insignificant date of September 11?

It looks like the “names, photographs, phone numbers, and other personal information” of Libyan security contractors was among the paperwork scooped up by tourists.  Hopefully none of that stuff finds its way into the hands of the terrorists whose existence the Obama Administration has been trying to ignore for the past three weeks.

What a miserable farce.  Since the FBI can’t get anywhere near Benghazi, could they perhaps try deputizing some of these free-range reporters to carry out the investigation for them?

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