The Chase 2012

Delegate guide for Super Tuesday states

On Super Tuesday, 10 states will vote and 437 delegates will be up for grabs in the Republican primary contest. Each state has different rules for allocating these delegates, especially since no state, per rules they agreed to with the Republican National Committee, can award all of its delegates on a winner-take-all basis.

As the election returns come in Tuesday, here is a guide as to how each state will award delegates

Ohio — 66 delegates
Semi-open primary (Democrats and Republicans will be holding primaries, and voters can ask for a Republican or Democratic ballot), binding

Candidates must receive at least 20 percent of the statewide vote to qualify for a share of the 15 delegates that will be awarded on a proportional basis (if a candidate gets more than 50 percent of the vote, the candidate will receive all of the 15 delegates on a winner-take-all basis). The winner of each of Ohio’s 16 congressional districts will get three delegates on a winner-take-all basis in each district won. Ohio’s three delegates to the RNC make up the last three delegates.

Georgia — 76 delegates
Open primary, binding

Candidates must receive 20 percent of the statewide vote to qualify for a share of the 31 delegates that will be awarded based in proportion to each candidate’s statewide vote.

Each of Georgia’s 14 congressional districts will award three delegates based on a proportional manner; however, if a candidate wins more than 50 percent of a district’s vote, that candidate will receive all of the district’s three delegates in a winner-take-all fashion.

The state’s other three delegates are the state’s delegates to the RNC.

Tennessee — 58 delegates
Open primary, binding

Candidates must receive at least 20 percent of the vote statewide and in each congressional district to qualify for delegates. Tennessee awards 28 delegates in a proportional manner based on the statewide vote and awards an additional 27 delegates in a proportional manner based on how each candidate does in the state’s nine congressional districts. The 28 statewide delegates and the three delegates in each of the state’s nine congressional districts can be taken in a winner-take-all manner if a candidate receives 66 percent of the vote statewide or in a congressional district. The other three delegates are the state’s delegates to the RNC.

Oklahoma — 43 delegates
Primary, binding

Candidates must receive 15 percent of the statewide vote to qualify for a share of the 25 delegates that will be awarded proportionally. In addition, candidates must receive 15 percent of the vote in each of Oklahoma’s five congressional districts to qualify for each district’s three delegates, which will be awarded proportionately. If a candidate receives a majority of the vote statewide or in a congressional district, that candidate receives all of the state’s 25 delegates or all of the congressional district’s three delegates, respectively, on a winner-take-all basis. The other three delegates are the state’s delegates to the RNC.

Alaska — 27 delegates
Caucus, binding

Alaska awards 24 delegates on a proportional basis based on the statewide caucus results. The other three delegates are the state’s delegates to the RNC.

Idaho — 32 delegates
Non-binding caucus

Every county will hold a caucus, and delegates will be allocated on a proportional basis.  If a candidate wins more than 50 percent of the state’s delegates, the delegates will be advised to go to the winner in a winner-take-all basis.

Vermont — 17 delegates
Open caucus, binding

In Vermont, a candidate must get at least 20 percent of the statewide vote to get delegates. 11 delegates will be divided proportionately among candidates based on the statewide vote total. The winner of the statewide vote gets an additional three delegates. Vermont’s remaining three delegates are the state’s delegates to the RNC.

North Dakota — 28 delegates
Caucus, non-binding

Delegates are unbound, but 25 will be advised to vote on the caucus results at the state convention. The other three delegates are the state’s delegates to the RNC.

Massachusetts — 41 delegates
Open primary, binding

Candidates must receive 15 percent of the vote statewide to qualify for a share of the 11 delegates that are awarded proportionately. Each of Massachusetts’ nine congressional districts will award three delegates proportionally; candidates must receive 15 percent of the vote in the district to qualify. The other three delegates are the state’s delegates to the RNC.

Virginia — 49 delegates
Open primary, binding

Candidates who get at least 15 percent of the statewide vote will divide 13 delegates in proportion to their vote. If a candidate gets more than 50 percent of the statewide vote, as Romney may do, the candidate will win all of the 13 delegates in a winner-take-all fashion. The other 33 delegates are awarded based on how each candidate does in each of Virginia’s 11 congressional districts. The winner of each congressional district will get the district’s three winner-take-all delegates. Virginia’s other 3 delegates are the state’s RNC delegates.

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  • acat

    So far, the primary voters have proven to be a pack genteel tea-sipping, blind dullards, fools, and imbeciles. Today my main man Mittens shows what being the only WINNER in the room is like. Most of the rest of you will lose interest in all of this soon. Then, it will be up to all of the “adults” you despise so much to try to elect a candidate that is better than the idiot currently in the office. That’s my two cat crackers worth of opinion. Paw out for treat …

    Suffering Succotash
    Mew

  • Guest

    Tony, ….. nice “vade mecum”