Defense & National Security

Don’t Change ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’

I just returned home from another U.S military function where it was my honor and privilege to be among the finest people in America.  Nothing is more satisfying and rewarding than spending time with our warriors and their families.

Our military is a discriminatory institution.  It discriminates based upon age, weight, eye-sight, physical disabilities, and the overall essentiality of a warrior spirit.  The military discriminates because it knows that killing the enemy in the most expeditious manner and winning wars is its mission, and that discriminating against certain people is the absolute best policy to ensure complete and total victory.  Who could possibly believe that’s a bad idea?

Not everyone can be a member of our military.  Americans have no constitutional right to join the military.  I was denied enlisting in the Marines a couple of years ago even though I offered to supply the Marines with all their ammunition requirements for a year if they would allow me to join.  No luck for the MotorCity gimpy guitarslinger.

From what I have learned by spending time with military men and women serving our great nation and by spending time with many more veterans, our military is a well-oiled machine that is fueled by good order, discipline, morale and unit cohesion.  Unlike our broken public school system and criminal justice system, our military is not a social experiment. Excellence is still the battle cry of warriors. Thank God.

Enter the debate over allowing homosexuals to openly serve in our military.  What this issue boils down to is what may or may not happen to the military’s good order, discipline, morale, and unit cohesion if they are allowed to openly serve.  Until someone can convince me that by allowing gays to openly serve in our military will improve our ability to wage and win wars, we should continue the 1993 law that does not permit gays to openly serve.

Over 1,000 retired generals hand-signed a letter to the White House, Pentagon and members of Congress opposing allowing homosexuals to openly serve in the military.  Good source for direction. In determining whether or not to allow gays to openly serve, our military and congress should strongly consider the thoughts of these 1,000 retired officers.  They know a thing or two about unit cohesion, good order, discipline, morale and combat readiness.

Another issue that is rarely discussed is how homosexual marriage plays into the equation of allowing homosexuals to openly serve. For example, let’s say a state allows two gays to marry and then one of the spouses decides to join the military.  How
will this impact our military?  Will our military have to recognize gay marriages, provide separate living quarters, provide health care for the homosexual’s spouse, and more? 

Should our military deny recognizing such marriages, this would open the legal floodgates because homosexuals would surely challenge our military in federal court on the grounds of being denied their civil rights. This is the pink elephant in the room that is rarely discussed and could potentially force the federal government to recognize gay marriage.  Just a thought.

We would also be naive to believe that homosexuals are not currently proudly and bravely serving in our military.  The facts are that a few have been pushed out of the military unless they openly flaunted their sexuality, which is violation of the 1993 law.

President Obama, former Vice President Cheney, Admiral Mullen and others now claim it is time to rethink the military’s position on allowing gays in the military.  I respect their opinions.  Let’s hope they respect the opinions of the 1,000 retired generals who oppose allowing gays to openly serve.

I have gay friends. We get along just fine. Live it up. However, when it comes to defending the nation there are other far more important standards to consider.

May God bless all our warriors and their loved ones.

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